Martinsburg, WV: Sorry Souls Motorcycle Club steps in to serve local families Thanksgiving dinner

Sorry Souls WV

MARTINSBURG — When COVID-19 put a halt to any Thanksgiving plans the Jefferson County Boys and Girls Club had, the local chapter of the Sorry Souls Motorcycle Club was there to step in. When COVID-19 put a stop to the Thanksgiving plans of the Berkeley and Morgan County clubs, too, the Sorry Souls were there yet again.

Members of the Jefferson County Sorry Souls spent their weekend raising funds for projects for the local Boys and Girls Club as well as the Jefferson County Community Ministries before coming together with members of all the local chapters Sunday to deliver more than 40 meals to families in need.

“No way would the Sorry Souls MC let this pandemic steal Thanksgiving dinner,” Jefferson County chapter president Scoob said.

Partners in community outreach, the Jefferson County Boys and Girls Club reached out to Scoob and his brothers about a month ago, looking for 30 turkeys to help feed local families who may go without that special meal on the holiday. Immediately agreeing to find what the club needed, the Sorry Souls got to work.

Ten days later, plans changed when a staff member contracted the virus and staff needed to quarantine, the Jefferson County sites all needing to close temporarily because that person floated between locations.

Thats when the Sorry Souls came together and figured they’d be able to step in, dropping off meals that wouldn’t otherwise be provided.

“You tell me how much food to put and where to go, and we’ll do it,” Scoob told the Jefferson County club.

As the motorcycle club was gearing up for the big fundraising event, the members learned that it wasn’t just Jefferson that wouldn’t be able to serve meals but the Boys and Girls Clubs in Berkeley and Morgan as well, the Sorry Souls members being asked if they could possibly step in for all three counties and the motorcycle club agreeing once more.

With the members having purchased a few turkeys themselves, things started to look dire when a 30-turkey donation fell through, the club in a bind to supply the meat for more than 40 families.

But through the partnership and generosity of JCCM, more than 30 total turkeys were gathered from that site alone, meaning everyone would have a meal. Residents of Scoob’s neighborhood also met the call when he posted in their Facebook group about the need.

“I somehow stored over 49 turkeys at my house for three days in three fridges, a freezer and some coolers,” Scoob said.

Tired from the widely successful fundraising event, members of the Jefferson County Sorry Souls chapter as well as members from every other local chapter gathered together to pack meal kits and deliver to families the very next day.

“We just set up an assembly line and knocked it out in 35 minutes,” Scoob said.

Visiting all but two families on the list on Sunday — scheduling other times for the final deliveries — that one day reminded the Sorry Souls brothers of so much, the thankfulness for what they have, the compassion for others in need and the desire not to judge others, not knowing what anyone’s life is really like.

Scoob said his brothers met many families that day who struck a cord in each of them from a man who was receiving his first Thanksgiving meal in 25 years to homes were several families were living at once.

“For us, it was humbling,” he said. “When you’re living in a rural area, it’s hard to get help.”

Scoob had encouraged members to bring their wives and girlfriends, children, neighbors and friends to the packing event, several riding along for the deliveries. Each returned with the same humility and desire to help more, reminded of the true lessons behind this holiday season.

“I am 100 percent proud,” Scoob said of his brothers. “We’ve got a list of a few people who really touched us. You don’t know what their likes are like. For me, it was just humbling. I just want to do more.”

And more will be done this holiday season as Scoob and his brothers have several ideas up their sleeves.

They’ll be using the extra funds from the fundraising event — the club more than surpassing the amount needed to complete projects at the Boys and Girls Club and JCCM — to help provide Christmas meals to families in need.

The Sorry Souls will also be hosting their annual Christmas toy event. On Dec. 12, the members will be holding their annual party where the entry fee is either a new toy or $20 donation. The next day, the doors of the clubhouse opening at 8 a.m. on Dec. 13, after stocking it like a store, families are allowed in to take toys as holiday gifts.

“I think it’s people who really need it. They take a few and leave,” Scoob said, adding a number of groups met through the Thanksgiving efforts were invited to come get toys for the family.

In a weekend that meant so much to so many — from the projects that will be completed for the local organizations to the families who now have a meal for the holiday — the club members themselves walked away with lessons learned and full hearts, meeting the needs of so many more than anticipated.

There was the mother who wanted to purchase raffle tickets to the fundraiser only for Scoob to learn the father of the family lost his job due to COVID-19, a connection with the Boys and Girls Club soon made to find a family willing to “adopt” that one for the holidays. Then there was the family who the Sorry Souls themselves, members of all four local chapters, adopted for the holiday season, the members able to meet the 6-year-old daughter at the fundraiser event. And there are the families who will receive delicious pies this holiday season as one prospective member gathered more than 40 donated by a baker friend to in turn give to those in need.

While one weekend left a mark on the community and on the souls for the Sorry Souls, it was a true indication of what the holiday season means and what giving hearts the club has.

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Source: The Journal